Xmas Brain Decoration

Let me start this off by agreeing with you – yes, this is a weird idea!

But when you work at the Herston Biofabrication Institute and spend most of your days working on neurosurgery and other medical projects, it hopefully makes a bit more sense why anyone would 3D print a “Merry Xmas” brain to decorate our office Christmas tree.

The design of this was quite simple and was based on some tutorials I’ve previously written about mashups and remixes – basically, taking 2 (or more) different files and joining them together in a new and creative way. The brain itself was downloaded here, and then the letters were quickly modelled in Solidworks and exported as individual STL files. All of this was then combined in Meshmixer, which is my go-to software for this type of mashup project (and it’s free for anyone looking to do the same).

This was 3D printed on my Craftbot Flow IDEX XL 3D printer in PLA, with a small hole drilled on the top afterwards to thread a piece of string through. And of course, I’m giving this design away for free to anyone crazy enough to also want a 3D printed Xmas brain decoration! Just click the links below to your preferred 3D print file website and enjoy:

Thingiverse, Cults, MyMiniFactory, Prusa, Pinshape.

Merry Christmas and happy 3D printing 🙂

– Posted by James Novak

3D Printed Hooks

20180521_3D Print Hook

3D printing really does solve so many problems – previously I’ve replaced a small whisk in a milk frother, produced my own kitesurfing fins, 3D printed locking mechanisms for some stand up paddles, and made numerous enclosures for Arduinos. What did we do before 3D printing?

This is yet another example of the need for a unique part – some hooks to display some work in front of my office, which could attach to some vertical plywood fins without permanent fixings like screws or staples. The plywood is 17mm thick, which was the only dimension needed to create this hook design, and I’ve modelled the arms to be a maximum of 17mm apart, with a 1º draft angle to really hold on to the plywood towards the back of the arms which are less than 17mm apart. This creates a good clamping force on the plywood. They are also designed so that they require no support material when 3D printing, making them fast and efficient to produce.

While it’s quite a unique case, I’ve decided to share the design on Thingiverse, Pinshape and Cults  in case it’s of use to anyone, or even just a good starting point for your own design. You could even try scaling them in width to fit the dimension of your vertical board. Happy printing.

– Posted by James Novak