Giant 3D Printed SUP Fin

20170511_3D SUP Fin

Behind the scenes I’ve been working on a Stand Up Paddle (SUP) fin project for quite a while now, 3D printing many prototypes, and more often than not, failing! There is more to this project than meets the eye, but for now the details are under wraps. However I thought it might be interesting to share some of the 3D prints in case anyone feels inspired to give it a go themselves.

The design pictured above is the first one that worked successfully without breaking or having other technical issues. Printed in 4 pieces on my Cocoon Createย due to the size, it required a bit of gluing, and as you can see from the pink highlight, a bit of gap filling with a 3Doodler Pen (if you want to know more about using a 3D printing pen as a gap filler, check out one of my previous posts all about it). As a result the fin is about 400mm long, huge compared to the fin that came with the board (which for any SUP fans out there is a Slingshot G-Whiz 9’4″)

20170511_3D SUP Fin

These images show some of the breakages I’ve had due to layer delamination – unfortunately the optimal way to print the 4 pieces in terms of minimising support material and warping is vertical, however the optimal orientation for strength is laying down on the flat sides (similar to the image on the right). A bit of an oversight on my part I’ll admit, however I was genuinely surprised how much force the flat water put on the fin. Another issue may be the minimal infill, which was also beefed up in my later prints to add internal strength. There is always a delicate balance between print orientation, layer strength and infill in 3D printing, to name just a few!

The main thing is that the fin prototype now works, and I may have a more advanced version being printed using Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) as I write this… If you keep an eye on my blog by subscribing below, you may just get to see where this project is going ๐Ÿ™‚

– Posted by James Novak

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3D Printed Action Camera Floaty

20161110_garmin-virb-3d-print

Most people when they get an action camera head straight out and start filming crazy things – not me!

I’ve just bought a Garmin Virb X action camera, choosing to avoid the popular GoPro’s for a number of reasons (I’ll spare you the details!) – suffice to say that the Garmin not only records great video, but has a range of built-in sensors allowing you to overlay data on top of video. If you’re curious to see what I mean, check out their promo video.

Since many of my interests are on the water (Kitesurfing and Stand Up Paddling) I needed to add the floatyย  – I lost a GoPro a few years ago in Hawaii by not having one, expensive mistake! Sure I could fork out the $27 for the Garmin floaty, but I already had a GoPro floaty as part of a kit, so why not make my own attachment?

The design of the Garmin Virb X has a range of great little details to snap on to, which is how the USB clips onto the side for charging and data transfer. So I’ve simply used these to create a 3D printed bracket, to which the GoPro floaty can stick. As you can see from the images above, 2 prongs hook around one side, while the snap comes around to the front and secures the bracket around the camera. And gee it makes a good snap sound when is attached! Very secure.

Print orientation is really important for this one, the bracket is printed standing up much like the pictures (you can see the layers in the left image). This means that when force is applied to flex and snap around the camera, the whole thing doesn’t break apart. Also a bit of filing or sanding is needed on the back face to give the floaty sticker a good surface area to stick on to. Otherwise it’s good to go straight off the printer, which took about 100 minutes to print on my Cocoon Create 3D printer. Solid infill, 0.2mm layer height, brim adhere to the platform and a small amount of support material.

If you need this part, it’s all yours for free – just download from your favourite site Thingiverse, Pinshape, 3D File Market or Cults.ย  Be sure to post a picture when you’re done, I hope it helps you get those awesome videos on or in the water.

– Posted by James Novak

Aldi 3D Printer -First Impressions

20160217_Cocoon Create

Yes that’s right, Aldi are selling a 3D printer! For those of you not familiar with Aldi, they are essentially a global supermarket chain, and here in Australia, they also sell “special buys” each week which could be anything from power tools to clothing and everything in between. This weeks special: the Cocoon Create 3D printer for $499AUD, a bit of a bargain when you look at its’ specs. Although of course I had been skeptical, being burned by my last 3D printer purchase from Solidoodle (which you can read more about here) which I have now hacked to do other things, and still waiting for the Tiko that I funded on Kickstarter last year I had to have one… It might be sad by I actually can’t live without a 3D printer anymore with all the work I’m doing.

However what really grabbed me is that being Aldi, this printer would come with a warranty (1 year) and be easily returned if it was a dud (a real challenge when most printers are bought online and can be difficult to return), and also this printer is based on the RepRap Prusa i3 which means any replacement parts and tweaks will be easy to obtain. With some nice upgrades, particularly the metal frame (as opposed to most RepRap’s which use acrylic or plywood and can therefore be quite flexible) this really looks like a promising machine . Like anyone else serious about getting their hands on these limited weekly specials, I joined the 2 or 3 other nerds outside my local Aldi before they opened, and made the mad dash inside like a kid in a candy store! As you can see, I was successful ๐Ÿ™‚

20160217_Cocoon Create Unbox

In the above photos you can see some of the initial finds from the package, which included a thorough manual designed to guide someone with little to no experience of setting up a 3D printer and using Cura to slice STL files through the process, a spare pad for the print bed, some tools, a small roll of PLA and a SD card to use for transferring the G-code from Cura onto the machine (there is also a USB connection, but I like the SD card which means I can have my printer in another room where the fumes can be ventilated). Setup was very quick with just a few screws to join the pieces together, and then the leveling of the bed. Let me summarise some of my initial observations and thoughts after doing a few small prints so far:

  • The navigation through the menus is a little bit old-school (reminds me of DOS!), and could benefit from a touch screen. However there are a lot of controls available in the menu, allowing you to really tweak the performance of the machine without connecting to a computer. The beeping sound as you scroll through each option is a little annoying.
  • The home screen of the printer (shown at the top) is awesome and shows some really useful information such as temperatures of both the nozzle and bed, and how much of the print has been completed.
  • Leveling of the bed is manual and easy to do with the 4 corner wingnuts. Many printers now come with auto-leveling which can be quick, but also doesn’t always seem to work as well as just leveling it out yourself.
  • At one point I wanted to stop a print part way through as it was lifting off the bed – you have to navigate through the menu to find this option, and the only other way is to switch off the power. An extra button just to pause or stop a print would be really handy for those emergency situations!
  • To remove a print you have to pry it off while fixed to the printer – you can’t just un-clip the bed and really get at it with a scraper. This may cause some problems down the line, every other printer I’ve ever used allows the bed to be removed.

These are just a few things I’m noticing right off the bat, but overall I’m really really impressed with this machine – the very first print I did worked flawlessly which you can see below.

20160217_Aldi 3D Printer

This SUP paddle clip (which you can read more about here) was 3D printed with the same settings I’ve used on the Up! Plus 2 printer, specifically a 0.2mm layer height and minimal support, and printed in about the same 50 minutes. I can honestly not tell the difference in quality, which is extremely clean and accurate. As I write this a second one has been printed to the same high quality. For $499 this is a much better finish than I expected!

Funnily enough a significant reason I started this blog in the first place was to share what I thought would be an enjoyable experience with the Solidoodle Press, and begin comapring it to other printers I’ve used and hopefully benefit others looking to get into 3D printing – it’s nice to finally come full circle back to writing about my experience with this (so far) promising 3D printer. Stay tuned for more frequent 3D prints, designs and discussion of how this printer performs.

– Posted by James Novak

Custom SUP Fin

20160125_Custom SUP Fin

I’ve recently bought my own Stand Up Paddle (SUP) board, an inflatable version from Flysurfer, which so far is working really well. But this isn’t a product review! My local paddling spots are all very flat, but the fins that came with the board are very surf oriented. This means that when paddling in flat water there is a lot of drag from the 2 outside fins which are angled out from the center line (see the middle photo), and the board doesn’t travel in a straight line – you have to swap hands every few strokes. It’s not a huge deal, but I was curious to see what difference a large single fin would make since most boards I’ve seen use this. Unfortunately Flysurfer don’t sell them, so it was time to get making!

All I did was use my flatbed scanner to capture the original fin shape (the black one in the right photo), trace the top section in Adobe Illustrator since this is the critical detailing to fit with the board, and then add my own shape for the fin based on the shape of some popular fins online. No 3D CAD required. This was laser cut from a piece of clear acrylic, and I used a file and sandpaper to add some shape to the edges. Voila.

Unfortunately I can’t give this particular design 2 thumbs up, it doesn’t perform quite as well as I expected. While it seems a little easier to glide through the water, the fin doesn’t improve the boards ability to hold a straight line – I think it’s a little bit loose in the socket and tilts on an angle in the water. The acrylic might be a little too thin, but it’s a start. I’ll make some tweaks and try again – it’s nice to make something that’s not 3D printed for a change.

If anyone has any experience playing around with different fin configurations or shapes I’d love to hear from you – I’ve read a few interesting articles from SUPguide.com and Neverbored but there’s only so much you can learn by reading, especially when you have to make your own fins because of the limitations of the inflatable board.

– Posted by James Novak

3D Printed SUP Paddle Lock

20151215 SUP Paddle Lock

With plenty of my designs available for you to download and make yourself on Thingiverse and Pinshape, this is officially the first product I’ve created through additive manufacturing for retail sale!

My local surf shop, Surf Connect, approached me with a unique problem: popular Stand Up Paddle (SUP) brand Ozoboard uses a snap-fit locking mechanism to allow for adjustment of the paddle length, but many customers have been losing them into the ocean. While it seems securely locked with the snap details onto the paddle shaft, somehow people just keep knocking them off, I guess because it is close to where people may be gripping the paddle with their hands. This is the grey part pictured in the middle image on the left.

A replacement part costs around $20 to buy, and to make things worse, the company making them is no longer able to supply them. So there are people stuck with paddles they can’t use because of this one small part. Well, as anyone who knows me would say, I’m up for any excuse to 3D print something new!

Some digital calipers, some Solidworks CAD software, and an hour or so of time is all it took to reverse engineer the lock details. The only trick is the metal pin which has been moulded into the original part, and takes all the forces of the 2 paddle shafts when they are locked in place. To do this as simply as possible I just used a screw with a matching diameter (a M6 x 12mm in 316 stainless steel) as shown in the top left image, gluing this with Araldite into place and concealing with a little cap. Other than the extra bulge to accommodate this, the 2 parts are identical.

Both parts were 3D printed on an Up! Plus 2 in about 50 minutes, and as you can see in the top right image, fits perfectly! Even I’m surprised that a) it fits first time, and b) it didn’t snap when popping around the paddle! The only thing yet to be seen is how well it holds up to use out on the water…

I will now be supplying these to Surf Connect exclusively to sell, since there is a genuine demand for them and no other way for people to get them. As a keen kitesurfer (and now SUPer with one of these Ozoboard paddles), I can imagine how annoying it is to be stuck on land when it’s perfect summer weather! If you need one, please get in touch. You can also download the design from Pinshape by clicking here.

– Posted by James Novak